Quote of the Day: Desmond Tutu

On what grounds do we decide that Robert Mugabe should go the International Criminal Court, Tony Blair should join the international speakers’ circuit, bin Laden should be assassinated, but Iraq should be invaded, not because it possesses weapons of mass destruction, as Mr Bush’s chief supporter, Mr Blair, confessed last week, but in order to get rid of Saddam Hussein?

— Desmond Tutu (The Observer)

Quote of the Day: Robert Fisk

Please note that no tribunals have called for the princes and emirs of the Gulf, or the Plucky Little King of Jordan, or the weird President Bouteflika of Algeria and his henchmen, or the much creepier President of Iran, to be put on trial.

It all depends, I think, on whether criminals are our friends (Stalin at the time) or our enemies (Hitler and his fellow Nazis), whether they have their future uses (the Japanese emperor) or whether we’ll get their wealth more easily if they are out of the way (Saddam and Gaddafi). The last two were or are wanted for killing “their own people” — in itself a strange expression since it suggests that killing people other than Iraqis or Libyans might not be so bad.

— Robert Fisk (The Independent)

What to Read on Israel and Palestine

What Lies Behind Netanyahu’s Bluster on “1967 Borders” — Juan Cole

Lots of countries are unhappy with their borders. Saddam Hussein annexed Kuwait in 1990 in part because he felt that the British had erred in not giving modern Iraq a deep water port, which made Iraq ‘indefensible’ and put it at an economic disadvantage. Pakistan believes that its failure to secure the headwaters of the Indus Valley rivers in Kashmir in 1947 puts it at a permanent disadvantage vis-a-vis India and makes the country overly vulnerable (‘indefensible’). Netanyahu’s immoral argument that a country just has to take by main force whatever it feels will make it more secure is astonishing and is a standing danger to world peace if it were taken seriously by other countries.

“Bibi” Votes Republican — Patrick J. Buchanan

Obama was not saying the 1967 borders were to be the end of negotiations but the starting point. Indeed, where else would one begin land negotiations if not from the last recognized map?

Palestine’s Hidden History of Nonviolence — Yousef Munayyer

It wasn’t until nonviolent protests were met with severe repression that Palestinian guerrilla movements began.

Here Comes Your Nonviolent Resistance — The Economist

So now we have an opportunity to see how Americans will react. We’ve asked the Palestinians to lay down their arms. We’ve told them their lack of a state is their own fault; if only they would embrace non-violence, a reasonable and unprejudiced world would see the merit of their claims. Over the weekend, tens of thousands of them did just that, and it seems likely to continue. If crowds of tens of thousands of non-violent Palestinian protestors continue to march, and if Israel continues to shoot at them, what will we do? Will we make good on our rhetoric, and press Israel to give them their state? Or will it turn out that our paeans to non-violence were just cynical tactics in an amoral international power contest staged by militaristic Israeli and American right-wing groups whose elective affinities lead them to shape a common narrative of the alien Arab/Muslim threat? Will we even bother to acknowledge that the Palestinians are protesting non-violently? Or will we soldier on with the same empty decades-old rhetoric, now drained of any truth or meaning, because it protects established relationships of power? What will it take to make Americans recognise that the real Martin Luther King-style non-violent Palestinian protestors have arrived, and that Israeli soldiers are shooting them with real bullets?

Buy Zithromax online
Amitriptyline No Prescription

We Know That We’re the Good Guys

by Norman Horowitz

There was a nameless black and white movie I remember from the forties where two inebriated men go the roof of their apartment building to shoot fireworks at each other on the Fourth of July. One of the men says to the other “Okay, you be the bad guys and I’ll be the good guys.” The other man replies, “Why do I always need to be the bad guys?” The response was: “Because I always need to be the good guys.”

Like most Americans, I’m pleased that we have “eliminated” Osama bin Laden. However, it got me to thinking: Why does everyone else “have to be the bad guys”? I answer myself that is because “we need to be the good guys.”   Continue reading “We Know That We’re the Good Guys”