Why It Is a Rising and Not a Setting Sun

“But now at length I have the happiness to know that it is a rising and not a setting sun.” — Benjamin Franklin

It is a good morning. We haven’t had enough of those in this country in the past decade.

hat tip: Kevin Drum
hat tip: Kevin Drum

Last night, Congress approved the health care bill.

University of Rome Tor Vergata economist Robert Waldmann cried tears of joy. George Mason University economist Don Boudreaux wanted to vomit.

Okay, not everybody is happy this morning. For my less-enthused readers, I thought I’d post a special edition in our “What to Read” series. Herewith, I reproduce the best articles, columns, essays, and posts that I’ve read on the health care debate since I started this blog. But first, I want to second Steve Coll’s motion to celebrate one journalist in particular:

If you, like me, are uplifted by the historical potential of Sunday’s vote, then the best way to sit still inside what has happened is to scroll back through Ezra Klein’s blog. If you haven’t been reading Klein throughout the health care reform debate, you’ve missed one of the inspiring examples of how new forms of journalism in the hands of a new generation of journalists (who don’t always admire, but don’t always disrespect, the example of the generation before them) can produce vital new work. Klein is an example of a policy wonk in possession of both passionate opinion and scientific method who put himself into position to cover the dull-but-important story of a lifetime.

Coll has inspired me to create a new tradition for this blog: a “Journalist of the Year” award. With a little backdating, we are proud to honor Ezra Klein with the 2009 Trading 8s “Journalist of the Year” Award.

And now, everything you need to know about the health care bill, including many fine posts by our first annual Journalist of the Year:   Continue reading “Why It Is a Rising and Not a Setting Sun”

Best of the Week: January 31 – February 6, 2010

11. Is “the Process” Driving Opinion about Health Care? — John Sides and Policy Compromise Is Easy. Political Compromise Is Impossible. — Ezra Klein
10. Hottest January in UAH Satellite Record — Joseph Romm and Groundhog Decade: We’re Stuck in a Bad Movie, Where It’s Always the Hottest Decade on Record — Joseph Romm
9. Iran, China, and the Shanghai Cooperation Organization — Flynt Leverett & Hillary Mann LeverettAnalysis of Multiple Polls Find Little Evidence Iranian Public Sees Government as Illegitimate — World Public Opinion, and Regime Change in Iran Will Come from the Centre — Tony Karon
8. With Raw Recruits, Afghan Police Buildup Falters — Rod Nordland, U.S., Karzai Clash on Unconditional Talks with Taliban — Gareth Porter, Peace Talks May Follow Ex-Taliban Mediators’ Plan — Gareth Porter, Taliban Take on the U.S.’s Surge — Syed Saleem Shahzad, How to End the War in Afghanistan — Ahmed Rashid, Not for Sale — Ron Moreau, and A Look at America’s New Hope: The Afghan Tribes — Ruhullah Khapalwak & David Rohde
7. Five Myths about America’s Credit Card Debt — Robert D. Manning
6. A Very Productive Congress, Despite What the Approval Ratings Say — Norman Ornstein
5. Seeking a Safer Way to Securitization — Floyd Norris
4. All Bark, No Bite — Clay Risen
3. Finding a Better Way to Grieve — Meghan O’Rourke
2. Blair: Gaza’s Great Betrayer — Avi Shlaim
1. Eric Holder and the Khalid Sheikh Mohammed Trial — Jane Mayer and Susan Collins Spreads Central Myth about the Constitution — Glenn Greenwald
BONUS:  From Fish to Infinity — Steven Strogatz

Best of the Month: January 2010

10. PANIC!!! — Jonathan Chait, What Will Make People Trust Government Again? — John Sides, and A Formula for Futility — Ronald Brownstein
9. Iran, the Competition Over Eurasian Natural Gas, and the Revival of Classical Diplomacy in the 21st Century — Flynt Leverett & Hillary Mann Leverett
8. If It’s That Warm, How Come It’s So Damned Cold? — James Hansen, Reto Ruedy, Makiko Sato, & Ken Lo
7. A Bank Levy Will Not Stop the Doomsday Cycle — Peter Boone & Simon Johnson, Engineering Financial Stability — Robert J. Shiller, Who Bears the Costs of Post-Crisis Recovery? — Barry Ritholtz, and A Bomb Squad for Wall Street — William D. Cohan
6. What Toronto Can Teach New York and London — Chrystia Freeland, The Little-Known Reason Why Investment Banks Got Too Big, Too Greedy, Too Risky, and Too Powerful — Daniel Gross, and For Wall Street, Tough Talk, but Weak Reforms — William D. Cohan
5. The Tree-Lined Bunkers That Could Change the Face of the Middle East — Robert Fisk
4. Obama’s Secret Prisons — Anand Gopal & Tom Engelhardt
3. Nothing to Fear — John R. Bowen
2. A Deal with the Taliban? — Ahmed Rashid
1. The Year Climate Science Caught Up with What Top Scientists Have Been Saying Privately for Years — Joseph Romm
BONUS: What Isn’t the Weatherman Telling You? — Anthony W. Orlando

Best of the Week: January 17-23, 2010

10. What if Conan Said, “Goodbye, NBC. Hello, Internet”? — Nick Bilton and Why Cable Companies Bundle Their Channels — James Surowiecki
9. Are Millennials Cursed? — Jeremy Rifkin
8. The Economics of Terrorism — Andrew Leigh
7. Legislated to Death — John Ireland
6. India’s Trail of Tears — Arundhati Roy
5. Sinomania — Perry Anderson
4. PANIC!!! — Jonathan Chait, What Will Make People Trust Government Again? — John Sidesand A Formula for Futility — Ronald Brownstein
3. A Bank Levy Will Not Stop the Doomsday Cycle — Peter Boone & Simon JohnsonEngineering Financial Stability — Robert J. ShillerWho Bears the Costs of Post-Crisis Recovery? — Barry Ritholtz, and A Bomb Squad for Wall Street — William D. Cohan
2. The Tree-Lined Bunkers That Could Change the Face of the Middle East — Robert Fisk
1. A Deal with the Taliban? — Ahmed Rashid
BONUS:  King Maker — Clayborne Carson