Financial Crisis Management for Small Businesses

Did you know that some of the world’s most successful businesses gained the edge over their competition in recessions? In times of crisis, how can you not only survive but thrive?

In this workshop for Cal Poly Pomona, I reveal the best practices to manage your liquidity, negotiate your commitments, and seize opportunities that only come when the market is weak.

You can watch the video by clicking here.

A Look Back at “Letter to the One Percent” with Atlanta Fed President Raphael Bostic

Can you believe it’s been over five years since I published Letter to the One Percent?

Well, it’s as relevant now as it was back then — maybe even more so.

In this new podcast episode with Raphael Bostic, president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, I discuss what’s changed, what hasn’t, and what we’re trying to do about it:

If you’re looking for some non-coronavirus news, you might enjoy giving it a listen or reading the transcript.

Bedrosian Book Club Podcast: “The Myth of Independence”

Congressional historian Sarah Binder joins neighbor and investment manager Mark Spindel in a look at the history of the relationship between the Federal Reserve and its legislative parent, Congress. The result is the Princeton University Press book The Myth of Independence: How Congress Governs the Federal Reserve.

Central to the book is the notion that the two institutions are interdependent rather than independent. The authors advocate that through legislation over the years, Congress has set up the Federal Reserve to bear the brunt of blame during times of financial crisis. This blend of political science, history, and economics was a hit for our panel. Why is it important to realize the relationship between Congress and the Fed is interdependent? What roles do transparency and accountability play in the relationship?

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Our American Discourse, Ep. 27: Why the Federal Reserve Is More Politically Constrained Than You Think

We’ve been having a mistaken debate, or so it would seem based on the new book The Myth of Independence. The Federal Reserve, the nation’s central bank and most influential economic regulator, isn’t as independent as critics like Rand Paul and Bernie Sanders suggest. Congress created it, and Congress continues to shape it to the people’s will. This new perspective might just change your expectations about Fed policy and your appreciation for their delicate strategic work.

In this episode, Sarah Binder discusses the historical research that led to this new thesis and helps us appreciate the interplay between two of America’s most important political institutions.

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Our American Discourse, Ep. 26: The Risky, Rocky Ride of Today’s Economy…and the Central Bankers Who Keep Watch

Just when you thought the economy was the only good news you could count on, the stock market took a dive on the heels of Janet Yellen’s exit from the Federal Reserve. Suddenly, Americans everywhere wondered whether the volatility and uncertainty in Washington had finally caught up with the long, steady recovery stretching from those dark days in 2009. Should we be worried? Who’s looking out for the economy? And do they have a plan for the risks that await us in 2018 and beyond?

In this episode, USC Price School Dean Jack H. Knott interviews Atlanta Fed President Raphael W. Bostic on the state of the economy and the forces that keep it humming along.

Continue reading “Our American Discourse, Ep. 26: The Risky, Rocky Ride of Today’s Economy…and the Central Bankers Who Keep Watch”