What Public Health, Law, and International Relations Leaders Have to Say About Withdrawing from the WHO

Today, President Trump officially began the process to withdraw the United States from the World Health Organization.

In my capacity as a public health scholar, I have joined 750 experts and leaders throughout the country in signing the following letter to the leadership of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations and the House Committee on Foreign Affairs:

Continue reading “What Public Health, Law, and International Relations Leaders Have to Say About Withdrawing from the WHO”

Fear: Trump in the White House

In this episode of the USC Bedrosian Bookclub Podcast, Lisa Schweitzer hosts a discussion with Christian Grose, Jeff Jenkins, and me about Bob Woodward’s latest reportage on the Presidency: Fear. How does this stack up to other Woodward titles and how does the principal-agent theory work its way into conversation with these political junkies? Click below to find out!

Is Trump Country Really Better Off Under Trump? No. It’s Falling Further Behind.

If you’ve been wondering what I’ve been working on lately, here is an excerpt of my research from my new post on the Washington Post site:

Two years have passed since Donald Trump made his famous campaign promise in disaffected regions across the country: “We are going to start winning again!” For many voters who felt that they had lost ground in recent decades, the candidate argued, a vote for him would be rewarded with renewed prosperity and prominence.

It was a classic campaign promise, overly ambitious and cleverly vague. What exactly did “winning” mean? Certainly, many reporters believed voters perceived the promise as an economic one. So let’s measure the promise’s success that way. How have Trump voters fared economically, compared with Hillary Clinton voters?

Not noticeably better, according to the data. By most measures, my latest research shows, Trump counties — and especially counties with higher proportions of Trump voters — continue to fall farther behind the rest of the country economically. The story of our economy, like the story of our politics, continues to be a story of division and divergence.

To read the rest, click here and check it out. Or if you really want to dig into the numbers, click here and read the whole paper!

Our American Discourse, Ep. 34: The Eternal Struggle for Power on Capitol Hill

Power is up for grabs in Washington. A controversial President, an unpopular Congress, and a midterm election all make 2018 a battleground for political control. Who will win? How will they do it? And what role do you play? This is story of the most consequential game ever played, and it’s told by one of the leading Congressional experts of our time.

In this episode, Jeffrey A. Jenkins teaches us the strategy of legislative power: who has it, how they get it, what they do with it, and why we should care.

Continue reading “Our American Discourse, Ep. 34: The Eternal Struggle for Power on Capitol Hill”

Our American Discourse, Ep. 28: Who Do Politicians Really Represent and Does the Electorate Notice?

With Donald Trump’s approval ratings at record lows, it’s worth asking how much this one number matters…and whether the people who approve really are better represented by him than the people who don’t. If our politicians really do represent some Americans better than others, it calls into question the very foundational ideals of our representative democracy.

In this episode, Brian Newman uncovers who’s represented, who’s not, and how it affects their view of government.

Continue reading “Our American Discourse, Ep. 28: Who Do Politicians Really Represent and Does the Electorate Notice?”