What’s the Use of Having Power if You Don’t Abuse It?

by Norman Horowitz

When I was at MGM, the person in charge of selling pay television (Jim) called me from Toronto to tell me that the Canadian pay TV buyer (John) had said that he could only buy rights to 18 of our pictures for the coming year. He was saving the rest of his money to buy independent films that he liked.

My obnoxious reply was, “Please tell John that there are two numbers of pictures available to him from MGM and that’s all of them or none of them.” Jim told me that John had told him that I would say just that.

I had the power, and I abused it. Why? Because there was no one to stop me!   Continue reading “What’s the Use of Having Power if You Don’t Abuse It?”

Marble Season

by Norman Horowitz

Growing up, I lived with my mother, father, brother, and Daisy, our dog that often bit me, in an apartment in the Kingsburg Road section of the Bronx at 2785 University Ave. I remember things like school and pretty girls, but mostly I remember the “street games” we played.

These games were determined by “the season.” Not summer, winter, spring, and fall, but rather yo-yo’s, tops, baseball cards, and marbles.

The marble activity was directed to the noble pursuit of somehow aggregating all the marbles in your neighborhood (or as many as you could). In retrospect, I wonder why it mattered that you had so many marbles, but it did.

I realized that on the streets it was okay to want to have all of the marbles, but that type of behavior could not or should not be sustained. The parental admonition was and is that you must “learn to share,” yet somehow, as we grow up, we are unwilling to share and want only to have more for ourselves.

As a Democrat, I believe that our system should allow everyone to at least have “a few marbles” and that no one should be allowed to control all of them. Continue reading “Marble Season”