Strategic Real Estate Innovation and the Value of Community Input

Long-term success is about more than just who gets hit first or even who gets hit hardest. It’s about resilience: who has the resources to survive, to thrive, to rebuild, to adapt, and to innovate.

That’s just a little snippet of my recent interview for CommercialCafe on strategic real estate innovation, investment, and development…

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What Public Health, Law, and International Relations Leaders Have to Say About Withdrawing from the WHO

Today, President Trump officially began the process to withdraw the United States from the World Health Organization.

In my capacity as a public health scholar, I have joined 750 experts and leaders throughout the country in signing the following letter to the leadership of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations and the House Committee on Foreign Affairs:

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Financial Crisis Management for Small Businesses

Did you know that some of the world’s most successful businesses gained the edge over their competition in recessions? In times of crisis, how can you not only survive but thrive?

In this workshop for Cal Poly Pomona, I reveal the best practices to manage your liquidity, negotiate your commitments, and seize opportunities that only come when the market is weak.

You can watch the video by clicking here.

Commercial Real Estate Industry Outlook

A couple weeks ago, I presented a brief economic forecast to the Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) organization in the Inland Empire of Southern California. If you’re interested to see what’s happening in the economy, what to expect, and what we can do about it, you can watch this 12-minute talk here:

My part of the session begins at 22:52, which is where the video above should start when you click play.

The Crisis Is Real, But We Have a Secret Weapon

Last Sunday, I wrote an op-ed on the COVID-19 crisis for the local newspaper in my childhood hometown, the Hazleton Standard-Speaker:

I’m writing from Los Angeles, where a Navy hospital ship is docked in the port, helping to treat the overwhelming surge of coronavirus patients flooding our health care system. I never thought I’d see such a day, but it’s here. And it’s a warning that we ignore at our peril.

The crisis is real. As of today, over 15,000 Americans have died from COVID-19. That’s five times the death toll on 9/11. In the coming weeks, millions will get the virus. We will lose more Americans than we did in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Vietnam combined.

But there is good news. Here in LA, the growth rate is starting to slow. In Italy where it was the worst, it is slowing significantly. In east Asia where it all began, the peak is far behind them, and the economy is starting to bounce back. If we can slow the growth rate across the United States, we can save hundreds of thousands, maybe millions, of lives.

I believe we can do it. But it’s going to require an unexpected weapon: compassion.

You can read the rest on the Standard-Speaker website if you have a subscription or if you want to buy a one-day subscription for $1.