Yes, Obamacare Critics, Health Insurance Does Make You Healthier

Michael Barone and Charles Krauthammer have some medical advice for you: Don’t get health insurance, they say. It won’t make you healthier. It’s a waste of money.

Obamacare Enrollment SurgeThey must be desperate. They don’t want to admit that they’ve run out of criticisms of Obamacare. The website is working, enrollments are surging, and millions of Americans are getting affordablehigh-quality health insurance. They couldn’t deny these facts, so they needed a new argument to discredit the law — and they found it tucked away in the New England Journal of Medicine.

In 2008, Oregon conducted an experiment. They held a random lottery. They picked 20,745 names out of a waiting list of 90,000 low-income adults who wanted to sign up for Medicaid. Of the winners, half received Medicaid, and half did not. After two years, they compared the two groups to see if the ones who had Medicaid were any better off.

Barone and Krauthammer claim that the Medicaid group did not have better health than the uninsured group, proving the futility of health insurance, but their conclusion is based on a very narrow, selective reading of the evidence.

It’s true that the individuals on Medicaid did not fare any better than their uninsured counterparts on blood tests for cholesterol, blood sugar, and blood pressure. But it’s also true that the Medicaid patients scored higher on the mental quality-of-life test, experienced significantly lower rates of depression, and reported that they felt healthier.

The Medicaid patients also experienced significantly less financial strain. They were 25 percent less likely to have an unpaid medical bill sent to a collection agency.

In other words, health insurance has significant mental and financial benefits.

In this study, the physical benefits are less clear, but that’s not surprising, given that it only lasted two years and it only measured three simple blood levels. Fortunately, other researchers have measured more than just cholesterol.

A 2008 study in the prestigious medical journal The Lancet, for example, revealed that uninsured patients were significantly more likely to develop advanced-stage cancer because they didn’t receive early screening to detect it.

A year later, Harvard researchers published a study in the Annals of Surgery showing that uninsured patients who arrived at the emergency room with traumatic injuries were almost twice as likely to die in the hospital as patients with insurance, even if they had the same race, gender, age, and severity of injury. Later that year, a similar study was conducted at the Boston Children’s Hospital and published in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery. It found that uninsured children were more than three times as likely to die from traumatic injuries as children with commercial insurance.

And if all that wasn’t enough to convince you, the American Journal of Public Health published a study that same year comparing the death rates of the insured and the uninsured when they had the same education, income, weight, rates of smoking and drinking, etc. They concluded that 44,789 Americans die every year simply because they don’t have health insurance.

That is the bottom line we should be talking about.

If the Oregon experiment were carried out beyond two years, the differences between the insured and the uninsured would accumulate. They found that the Medicaid patients were 70 percent more likely to visit the doctor, 20 percent more likely to have their cholesterol monitored, and for the women, 60 percent more likely to get a mammogram. Those kinds of preventive measures don’t make a huge impact in two years, but in the long run, they can mean the difference between life and death.

Health insurance is so beneficial to your health, in fact, that its effects spillover and benefit those of us around you. Studies have shown, for instance, that companies that offer health insurance are more productive because insured workers take 52 percent fewer “sick days” than their uninsured co-workers.

I have to wonder if Barone and Krauthammer have ever even met anyone on Medicaid. I wonder if they know the terrible fear that uninsured Americans feel when they get sick and they’re forced to choose between astronomical medical bills and untreated illness.

I think they should find out. If they’re so confident that health insurance doesn’t affect your health, then I would like to issue this challenge to them: Give up your own health insurance. Don’t waste another penny on it. Join the ranks of the uninsured.

If not, if they’re unwilling to follow their own advice, then they should stop giving it. They should stop spreading misinformation that can hurt millions of Americans who read their op-ed columns and who depend on the access to lifesaving medical care that only health insurance can provide.

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This op-ed was published in today’s Huffington Post. An abbreviated version was published in the South Florida Sun-Sentinel.

Three Dirty Little Words: Liberal Media Bias

“Are any of you voting for Mitt Romney?” host Jimmy Kimmel asked the audience at the Emmy’s last month. “Okay,” he said after listening to the smattering of applause, “there’s forty Republicans and the rest: godless, liberal homosexuals.”

“Being a Republican in Hollywood,” he joked, “is like being a Chick-fil-A sandwich on the snack table at Glee.”

I work in Hollywood. So I’ve seen my fair share of “liberal bias.” And I’m here to tell you that there is no liberal bias in the American media.

Oh sure, some news outlets are more liberal than others. Everyone knows that MSNBC is the channel for Democrats and Fox News is the channel for Republicans. And everyone knows that the editorial page of the Wall Street Journal is more conservative than that of the New York Times. But it is flat-out untrue that the media as a whole leans to the left.

I mention this because Paul Ryan, the Republican nominee for vice president, recently accused the media of trying to swing the election in his opponents’ favor.

All evidence to the contrary. This summer, the Pew Research Center examined the news reports of 50 major news outlets and found that 72 percent of the references to Barack Obama were negative, compared to 71 percent of the references to Mitt Romney. Similarly, statistical wunderkind Nate Silver examined the historical record and found that presidential election “polls have no…history of partisan bias.”

This won’t come as a surprise to anyone who’s spent any time studying the subject. Experts have combed through the archives looking for all sorts of bias. The Journal of Communication collected the results of 59 published research papers on media bias, and they came to three clear conclusions: In newspapers, there is no bias. In network television, there is a tiny — and I mean tiny — liberal bias. And in magazines, there is — wait for it — a conservative bias!

But you don’t have to read the Journal of Communication to figure that out. Just look around you. As media reporter David Carr pointed out earlier this week, the bestselling newspaper in America is the famously conservative Wall Street Journal, the most popular cable news channel is Fox News, and three of the top five radio broadcasters are Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, and Michael Savage — and those guys make Mitt Romney look like Lyndon Johnson.

Moreover, every major news outlet is owned by a massive multinational corporation. Gannett owns the USA Today. Time Warner owns CNN. Comcast and General Electric own NBC and MSNBC. Walt Disney owns ABC. The New York Times, the Washington Post, and CBS are all listed on the New York Stock Exchange — and the majority shareholder of CBS is the billionaire Sumner Redstone.

Where do you think the sympathies of these mega-rich capitalists lie? Do you really think they’d let their news outlets dismantle the free market system that’s made them so wealthy?

And so what if they did? Is a “liberal bias” inherently wrong? Instead of asking whether a news outlet is conservative or liberal, shouldn’t we be asking if they’re right? Shouldn’t we demand, above all else, that the media tell us the truth? And what law of nature says that the truth is always nonpartisan?

It’s a fact that tax cuts for the rich haven’t increased economic growth. It’s a fact that the Earth is warming because of carbon emissions from manmade objects. It’s a fact that Palestine is a humanitarian disaster because Israel is blockading critical exports and imports.

And we’re supposed to sugarcoat these facts because they don’t fit into some people’s agendas?

The economist Paul Krugman has a famous saying: “If a presidential candidate were to declare that the earth is flat, you would be sure to see a news analysis under the headline ‘Shape of the Planet: Both Sides Have a Point.'”

And who comes up with these “sides” anyway?

In Europe, “conservatives” recoil at the idea of a government failing to allocate affordable health insurance to all its citizens. In America, rightwinger Glenn Beck gets a primetime slot on television, but a real leftist like Noam Chomsky is taboo.

Who’s the liberal equivalent of Glenn Beck? Rachel Maddow? Come on. This is a woman who said she’s “in almost total agreement with the Eisenhower-era Republican party platform.”

When was the last time you heard an American politician say that the government should give a job to every unemployed person who is willing and able to work? How many media pundits endorse tax rates above 50 percent or the abolition of nuclear weapons? Forty years ago, some of our most famous leaders were advocating exactly these solutions. Now, they’re fringe ideas at best.

Every time someone says “conservative” or “liberal,” I’m reminded of a line from the movie Princess Bride: “You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.”

My point here isn’t that we should change the system or that we should embrace leftist ideology. All I’m saying is, this is a ridiculous debate, and we must stop having it because it’s distracting us from the real issues in a very important election.

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An abbreviated version of this op-ed was published in today’s South Florida Sun-Sentinel.