The Tax Cut That Never Was

Finally! Prof. Mishra has offered some evidence to support his argument. Granted, it’s not accurate evidence, but at least he’s trying.

Here’s the example that Prof. Mishra thinks is evidence of tax cuts increasing tax revenue:

Indeed, in 1986, when President Reagan lowered the top tax bracket from 50 percent to 28 percent, it led to an enormous rise in federal tax revenues as well as a great expansion in small business and entrepreneurial activities, leading to more job creation and economic growth.

Well, that’s one way to rewrite history.

As I’ve said over and over, the business cycle that Reagan presided over experienced the exact same economic growth — 3 percent per year — as the one overseen by Nixon, Ford, and Carter. And since tax cuts supposedly increase tax revenues by increasing economic growth, the entire argument falls apart because they didn’t increase economic growth.

But what makes Prof. Mishra’s example really embarrassing is that the Tax Reform Act of 1986 was a tax increase, not a tax cut! Continue reading “The Tax Cut That Never Was”

A Failure to Communicate, Not a Failure to Stimulate

It’s a little difficult to reply to Prof. Mishra’s latest op-ed because it doesn’t really have a point. It goes all over the place. As far as I can tell, the only actual argument he makes against President Obama’s American Jobs Act is:

…the first stimulus bill in 2008, a $700 billion package geared toward government spending to stimulate the economy, and financed with borrowed money, has obviously failed to create new jobs.

He never offers any evidence to support this claim.

I’ve disproven this hypothesis before, but I’ll do so again — first by repeating what I said last time, then with even more evidence. If you’ve already read the first part, you might want to skip to the new stuff, though it can’t hurt to refresh your memory…   Continue reading “A Failure to Communicate, Not a Failure to Stimulate”

The Greeks Are Coming! The Greeks Are Coming!

Ronald Reagan signed the first of two famous tax cuts on August 13, 1981. A few months later, one of his senior advisors gave an interview to the Atlantic Monthly where he revealed that the administration really didn’t care about cutting most people’s taxes. The tax cuts that affected most Americans, he explained, were “a Trojan horse to bring down the top rate” for the rich.

The Trojan horse was the giant wooden gift that the city of Troy received from the Greeks, only to find that Greek soldiers poured out of the horse once they were inside the city. In the Reagan administration’s metaphor, the “Greeks” were tax cuts for the rich, and the unwitting city of Troy was, well, the rest of us.

It worked.

But it came at a price.

In the three decades preceding Reagan, the bottom 90 percent of Americans enjoyed a 75 percent increase in their inflation-adjusted incomes. In the three decades after Reagan, these same Americans enjoyed only 1 percent income growth, while the richest 1 percent saw their incomes grow by over 100 percent.   Continue reading “The Greeks Are Coming! The Greeks Are Coming!”

5 Ways to Sound Stupid When Discussing the Debt Ceiling

In the past week, I’ve had conversations with people who voiced the following myths. Read and learn, lest you embarrass yourself in the same way.

Myth #1: Federal debt has been increasing under all presidents since World War II.

Reality: Federal debt steadily declined from the mid-1940s to the early 1980s, then it increased dramatically (with a brief hiatus in the mid-to-late 1990s). Ronald Reagan reversed four and a half decades of safe, responsible fiscal policy, and every successor except Bill Clinton followed his lead. See for yourself:   Continue reading “5 Ways to Sound Stupid When Discussing the Debt Ceiling”

Quote of the Day: Ezra Klein

Obama wasn’t lying when he talked about the many Republican-friendly tax cuts included in the stimulus, the many conservative ideas that formed the core of the health-care law and the trillions in GOP-demanded spending cuts that were added to his budget proposals. But McConnell wasn’t lying when he said that Republicans cared more for defeating the president than for anything else — and that “anything else” includes passing policy initiatives they had long supported.

— Ezra Klein (Washington Post)

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