Best of the Week: September 5-11, 2010

10. Liability and Excessive Risk Taking: Historical Evidence from Britain’s Banks — Richard S. Grossman & Masami Imai and Mortgage Rates and Home Prices — David Leonhardt
9. Free Speech Helped Avert Quran Burning — Jack M. Balkin, They Used to Burn Catholic Churches, Now They Burn Mosques — Juan Cole, and Catholics, Muslims, and the Mosque — John T. McGreevy & R. Scott Appleby
8. Is Chinese Mercantilism Good or Bad for Poor Countries? — Dani Rodrik
7. Did the Federal Government Create the Great Divergence? Part 1Part 2Part 3Part 4and Part 5 — Timothy Noah and It’s Not the Party; It’s the Policies — Robert Pollin
6. The Specter Haunting the Senate — Michael TomaskyPeople Don’t Listen to the President — Ezra Kleinand Waves Are for Surfing — Daniel Hopkins
5. Health Care: The Disquieting Truth — Arnold Relman and Why the ER Is So Crowded — Ezra Klein
4. The Crime Wave That Shames the World — Robert Fisk
3. Insights from the Afghan Field — Anatol Lieven and Top Ways 9/11 Broke Islamic Law — Juan Cole
2. Hard Times for Workers on Labor Day 2010 and Holding Wal-Mart Accountable — Harold Meyerson, Confessions of a Serial Liberty-Reducer — Peter Dorman, and Why Obama Is Proposing Whopping Corporate Tax Cuts, and Why He’s Wrong — Robert Reich
1. Beware of Greeks Bearing Bonds — Michael Lewis
BONUS: Keynes’s Conference and Morgenthau’s Dream — Eric Rauchway and How FDR’s Concessions Saved the Social Security Act — David M. Kennedy

Best of the Week(s): July 11-24, 2010

10. Should South Korea Be Allowed to Reprocess Spent Fuel? — Stephen M. Walt, The Great Myth: Counterinsurgency — Conn Hallinanand A Strategy of Staggering Genius in Sudan? — Jack Snyder
9. Overcome by Heat and Inertia — David Leonhardt and Climate Bill, R.I.P. — Tim Dickinson
8. The Pundit Delusion — Paul Krugman, I Leave More Discontented Than I Started — David Obeyand It’s Always the Economy, Stupid — Ezra Klein
7. Bail-Ins, Soft Budget Constraints, and Zombie Banking — e21
6. The Real Story of Racism at the USDA — Chris Kromm and Drug Sentences Create Racial Caste System — Leonard Pitts, Jr.
5. Deficits Do Matter, But Not the Way You Think — L. Randall Wray and What Do Deficit Slashers Wear Under Their Hair Shirts? — Robert Skidelsky
4. Worth It — Andrew Cockburn, Toxic Legacy of U.S. Assault on Fallujah “Worse Than Hiroshima” — Patrick Cockburn, and Vietnam’s Forgotten War Victims — Chris Arsenault
3. The Massachusetts Plan Is Working, But the American Health Care System Is Not — Ezra Klein
2. Iraq Withdrawal? Obama and Clinton Expanding U.S. Paramilitary Force in Iraq — Jeremy Scahill
1. 5 Place to Look for the Next Financial Crisis — Ezra Klein
BONUS:  Your Move: The Maze of Free Will — Galen Strawson

Step Right Up and Buy an Excuse!

Continuing the risk vs. uncertainty explanation, here’s my latest post on the Sun-Sentinel site. In the next couple weeks, I’ll delve deeper into these issues and hopefully illuminate some solutions for regulations going forward. For now, check out some excellent perspectives that point the debate in the right direction. I encourage you to read the original articles by each of the three pundits I cited.

Tomorrow I’ll get back to our music countdown. We also have some exciting work by other writers to highlight later this week!

Best of the Week: April 25 – May 1, 2010

10.  Noriega’s Last Laugh — Christopher Dickey and Atrocities in Afghanistan: A Troubling Timetable — Kathy Kelly & Dan Pearson
9. To Save the Eurozone: $1 Trillion, European Central Bank Reform, and a New Head for the IMF — Peter Boone & Simon Johnson and The European Experience with Large Fiscal Adjustments — Alcidi Cinzia & Daniel Gros
8. Climate Change Indicators in the United States: Summary of Findings — Nick Sundt and CCS Stunner: New Study Finds Geologic Sequestration “Is Not a Practical Means to Provide Any Substantive Reduction in CO2 Emissions” — Joseph Romm
7. Immigration Reform Is Working. Now We Need to Look at What Isn’t. — Edward Schumacher-Matos, To “Control the Border,” First Reform Immigration Law — Daniel Griswold, and The Predictable Tragedies of Arizona’s Anti-Immigration Law — Ezra Klein & Ta-Nehisi Coates
6. The Deficit: Nine Myths We Can’t Afford — Pavlina R. Tcherneva, Stephanie Kelton, L. Randall Wray, Marshall Auerback, Yeva Nersisyan, & Warren Mosler, Do Not Confuse Solvency with Sustainability — Pavlina R. Tcherneva, and Paul Samuelson on Deficit Myths — L. Randall Wray
5. Why Financial Reform Needs a Bank Tax — David LeonhardtWho’s Afraid of a Bank Tax? — David Leonhardt, and Endgame in the Financial Reforms — David Skeel
4. Return of the Death Squads — Jeremy Kryt and Are Aid Donors Now Running Haiti? — Daniel Altman
3. Nukes for Sale — Jeremy Bernstein and A New Start — Tara McKelvey
2. Chris Dodd’s Carve-Outs for Cronies — Mark A. Calabria and Big Business Pleads for Loopholes in Financial Regulatory Reform — Steven Pearlstein
1. Cruel Ethiopia — Helen Epstein and The State of Liberal Democracy in Africa: Resurgence or Retreat? — Tony Leon
BONUS: Chances Are — Steven Strogatz

Why It Is a Rising and Not a Setting Sun

“But now at length I have the happiness to know that it is a rising and not a setting sun.” — Benjamin Franklin

It is a good morning. We haven’t had enough of those in this country in the past decade.

hat tip: Kevin Drum
hat tip: Kevin Drum

Last night, Congress approved the health care bill.

University of Rome Tor Vergata economist Robert Waldmann cried tears of joy. George Mason University economist Don Boudreaux wanted to vomit.

Okay, not everybody is happy this morning. For my less-enthused readers, I thought I’d post a special edition in our “What to Read” series. Herewith, I reproduce the best articles, columns, essays, and posts that I’ve read on the health care debate since I started this blog. But first, I want to second Steve Coll’s motion to celebrate one journalist in particular:

If you, like me, are uplifted by the historical potential of Sunday’s vote, then the best way to sit still inside what has happened is to scroll back through Ezra Klein’s blog. If you haven’t been reading Klein throughout the health care reform debate, you’ve missed one of the inspiring examples of how new forms of journalism in the hands of a new generation of journalists (who don’t always admire, but don’t always disrespect, the example of the generation before them) can produce vital new work. Klein is an example of a policy wonk in possession of both passionate opinion and scientific method who put himself into position to cover the dull-but-important story of a lifetime.

Coll has inspired me to create a new tradition for this blog: a “Journalist of the Year” award. With a little backdating, we are proud to honor Ezra Klein with the 2009 Trading 8s “Journalist of the Year” Award.

And now, everything you need to know about the health care bill, including many fine posts by our first annual Journalist of the Year:   Continue reading “Why It Is a Rising and Not a Setting Sun”