My Goal for the New Year…Quoted in Forbes

Forbes columnist Rob Asghar has a new article titled “A Novel Tip for Making Smarter Predictions,” where he announces my goal to read more novels in 2018:

“I’ll admit that I’m coming to see the value of such an approach, but for years, I resisted it,” says Anthony W. Orlando, an economist and author based at USC’s Price School of Public Policy. “I figured, when trying to figure out what will happen, is it really the best use of my time to read a bunch of things that didn’t happen? But I’ve committed now to reading more of the fiction classics in the coming year.”

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Bedrosian Book Club Podcast: “Democracy in Chains”

Nancy MacLean’s Democracy in Chains begins as the story of James Buchanan, the Nobel Prize-winning economist who popularized public choice economics. MacLean argues that Buchanan joined up with wealthy special interest individuals to influence politics. In partnership with the Koch brothers, MacLean argues that Buchanan and other public choice economists worked directly to benefit a small group of propertied individuals over the will of the majority.

The work was longlisted for the National Book Award while also being widely and sharply criticized by conservative think tanks and public choice economists.

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Our American Discourse, Ep. 22: While the World Burns, a More Sustainable Future Is in the Making

At this very moment, wildfires rage across Southern California. Florida, Puerto Rico, and Texas are picking up the pieces from Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. These are only the latest instances of an increasingly volatile and destructive climate. But there is hope. Even as the United States withdraws from the Paris Agreement “for Sustainable Development,” cities, states, and private companies are rushing to fill the void. Sustainability is becoming a win-win-win: environmentally, socially, and even financially. The question is, are we too late?

In this episode, Christine Harada gives us an optimism that sustainability can prevail — and tangible proof that we can make it happen right in our own backyard.

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Our American Discourse, Ep. 21: How the Senate Can Beat Gridlock—and Why That’s Not Always a Good Thing

Americans are fed up with gridlock. Congress is one of the least popular institutions in the country. So you might think the solution is for legislators to pass major legislation. But what if the solution is even more controversial than the problem? If you’ve heard of “budget reconciliation,” you probably didn’t hear unanimously good things. That’s because it’s a risky game…a fascinating, strategic game deep in the trenches of our democratic tug-of-war.

In this episode, Molly E. Reynolds teaches us how budget reconciliation works, where it came from, how it’s being wielded, and why you should care.

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